News and Events

As we continue to come to terms with our changing lives and environments in the face of COVID-19, CIGS is launching “Writing Together Wednesdays” – a chance to gather online to engage in a couple of hours of friendly, collective writing. We will meet at 1.45 on Zoom each Wednesday...

    Wednesday 19th February Drinks and snacks from 12.30, Seminar from 1-2pm (Social Sciences Building, 12.21 / 25) All welcome. What violence can we do, in the name of fighting sexual violence? This is the central question animating Alison Phipps’ forthcoming book Me, Not You: the trouble with mainstream feminism (Manchester...

This semester, CIGS is organising two reading groups around the theme of “Anger”. The dates and readings are listed below. Both sessions will be held in the postgraduate common room in the Social Sciences Building (Rm 11.09). Tuesday 29th October, 1-2pm Lorde, Audre (1981) “The uses of anger” Women’s Studies...

In the run up to the Christmas break, CIGS ran a campaign on period poverty, inviting members to donate sanitary products that would be distributed locally to those in need. The response was simultaneously generous and furious, with many people expressing frustration that charitable donations were the only way for...

Wednesday 13th February,  12 – 13.30pm, Rm 12.21 / 25 in School of Sociology & Social Policy, Univ. of Leeds Over the past few years entrepreneurs such as Ella Mills (Deliciously Ella), Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley (Hemsley + Hemsley) and Madeleine Shaw (Get the Glow) have achieved extraordinary levels of cultural...

Less than ten percent of Wikipedia editors are women, an imbalance which can be read as yet another case of the masculine culture of technoscience. However, Wikipedia’s infrastructure introduces new and less visible sources of gender disparity. In this talk I present a consolidated analysis of the gendering of Wikipedia.

Time and Location Details

15th March 2017
12:00 – 13:30
Room 12.21 and 12.25, Social Sciences Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT.
This event is free to attend and no booking is required.

Data visualisation has been argued to have the power to ‘change the world’, implicitly for the better, but when it comes to abortion, both sides make moral claims to ‘good’. Drawing on her recent research, Hill argues that data visualisations are being used as a hindrance to women’s access to abortion, and that the critique of such visualisations needs to come from feminists, as well as the data visualisation community.

Time and Location Details

1st March 2017
12:00 – 13:30
Room 12.21 and 12.25, Social Sciences Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT.
This event is free to attend and no booking is required.