Blog

CIGS members were deeply saddened by the loss of our colleague Matthew Wilkinson, who played a key role in the centre over the years. Here, Ruth Holliday shares her memories of Matthew. Matthew Wilkinson 1972-2021 I had recently taken over as Director for the Centre of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies from...

Coping With and Thinking About the Big C: The Experience and Reflections of a Young Feminist after a Breast Cancer Diagnosis ‘It is cancer’. An experienced surgeon with grey hair who seemed like the chief of the clinic, sitting in front of me, staring straight into my eyes, announced the...

“I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change. I am changing the things I cannot accept.” ― Angela Y. Davis As many of us witness the biggest civil rights movement in history from our living room (1), it is easy to feel overwhelmed and helpless, particularly if you...

I spent 2019 conducting ethnographic fieldwork in and around professional wrestling as part of my project into concussion in contact sport. Wrestling is an unusual beast that sits somewhere in between sport and theatre – the impacts and toll on the body are very real, but the performances are choreographed...

By Ruth Holliday – Professor of Gender and Culture. (This post was originally published by the Sociological Review ) Cosmetic surgery for working-class and lower middle-class patient-consumers is a source of value. It is a type of body-capital that can be exchanged in the (service) labour market (and in relationships...

Rosemary Lucy Hill discusses sexual harassment, assault and groping at live music events, and what can be done about it. Pauli[i], aged 15, was watching one of her favourite bands. She was having a great time dancing and had an excellent spot near the front. There was a drunk man...

100 years on from women gaining the right to vote in the UK what does having vote mean to women in Britain? Rosemary Lucy Hill spoke to colleagues in the School of Sociology and Social Policy about their personal feelings regarding the vote. Their responses reveal a mixture of valuing the right to vote, frustration with the current political system, noting the distance still to travel and a strong sense of pride in our great grandmothers’ arguments, organisation and determination.